What Coming Out Means for Trans and Trans-questioning People

I just spent a lot of time composing a reply to a post entitled Dyke March Diaries: Coming Out on the IMPACT Program’s blog before realizing that it does not allow comments. So I thought I would post my comment here instead:

This is a very well-edited video, and the people in it are so inspiring! I am glad you and other folks are doing the vital work of recording the experiences of people in our community.

If I were to add anything, I would highlight the adversity that some people aligned with the T faced at Dyke March in 2010. In 2009 I, a transsexual woman, had tried to be involved in the Chicago Dyke March Collective (CDMC) and found the collective to be hostile towards trans people, especially those of us who are women or who have a feminine presentation. In response to this a number of trans folks, trans-questioning folks, and allies joined me in going to Dyke March to both celebrate our pride and resist CDMC’s marginalization of trans people. It is excruciatingly difficult to find queer “community” after facing rejection from mainstream society, only to find out that the “community” rejects us well. Despite this and a number of personal hardships, the other members of Stellar took a stand in 2010 and showed me what real community looked like. If Dyke March is a safer place for trans people this year, we will be indebted to the people who have been standing with us all along. Thank you, trans folks, trans-questioning folks, and allies, for the amazing demonstration of resilience!

I will be posting more about Stellar in the next month or two. For anyone whose interest I may have piqued I will at this time just link to a press release we sent before last year’s Dyke March:

Stellar calls for resistance on two fronts at Dyke March

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5 Responses to What Coming Out Means for Trans and Trans-questioning People

  1. Kirsten says:

    It’s a shame there’s not more support there. :/

    • Lika says:

      I know, eh? Not that I think it’s worse for a marginalized group to commit acts of oppression than a privileged group but for a group to talk about marginalization while oppressing another group is highly hypocritical and makes them lose a lot of credibility.

      • Veronika says:

        I must be doing something right, if the Canadians who read my blog come back for more, eh?

        Seriously, your and Kirsten’s support means a lot to me.

  2. Lika says:

    Despite this and a number of personal hardships, the other members of Stellar took a stand in 2010 and showed me what real community looked like. If Dyke March is a safer place for trans people this year, we will be indebted to the people who have been standing with us all along.

    It’s a shame they didn’t have a place for you to comment,as their description reads, “The Chicago Dyke March is a grassroots mobilization and celebration of dyke, queer, and transgender resilience”, and your comment does a wonderful job of what resilence IS. They should know about it, and know that they ought to rally behind you and Stellar in making this year’s march a safe place for trans people.

  3. Kirsten says:

    I’m glad Veronika. 🙂

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